Current Evidence to Propose Different Food Supplements for Weight Loss: A Comprehensive Review

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Mikiko Watanabe, Renata Risi, Davide Masi, Alessandra Caputi, Angela Balena, Giovanni Rossini, Dario Tuccinardi, Stefania Mariani, Sabrina Basciani, Silvia Manfrini, Lucio Gnessi, Carla Lubrano
1. Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Medical Pathophysiology, Food Science and Endocrinology, Sapienza University of Rome, 00161 Rome, Italy; 2. Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, University Campus Bio-Medico of Rome, 00128 Rome, Italy

Nutrients (MDPI) 2020
12 : 9
2873
10.3390/nu12092873
English
Watanabe M, Risi R, Masi D, Caputi A, Balena A, Rossini G, Tuccinardi D, Mariani S, Basciani S, Manfrini S, Gnessi L, Lubrano C. Current Evidence to Propose Different Food Supplements for Weight Loss: A Comprehensive Review. Nutrients. 2020 Sep 20;12(9):2873. doi: 10.3390/nu12092873. PMID: 32962190; PMCID: PMC7551574.. Share Research.
Abstract
The use of food supplements for weight loss purposes has rapidly gained popularity as the prevalence of obesity increases. Navigating through the vast, often low quality, literature available is challenging, as is providing informed advice to those asking for it. Herein, we provide a comprehensive literature revision focusing on most currently marketed dietary supplements claimed to favor weight loss, classifying them by their purported mechanism of action. We conclude by proposing a combination of supplements most supported by current evidence, that leverages all mechanisms of action possibly leading to a synergistic effect and greater weight loss in the foreseen absence of adverse events. Further studies will be needed to confirm the weight loss and metabolic improvement that may be obtained through the use of the proposed combination.
botanicals; dietary supplements; insulin resistance; metabolic syndrome; nutraceuticals; obesity; weight loss.

The use of food supplements for weight loss purposes has rapidly gained popularity as the prevalence of obesity increases. Navigating through the vast, often low quality, literature available is challenging, as is providing informed advice to those asking for it. Herein, we provide a comprehensive literature revision focusing on most currently marketed dietary supplements claimed to favor weight loss, classifying them by their purported mechanism of action. We conclude by proposing a combination of supplements most supported by current evidence, that leverages all mechanisms of action possibly leading to a synergistic effect and greater weight loss in the foreseen absence of adverse events. Further studies will be needed to confirm the weight loss and metabolic improvement that may be obtained through the use of the proposed combination.

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